The Black Collegial Experience

What is the Black Collegial Experience? How is the nature of this experience altered in PWIs?Let’s talk. Please check the "Archive" for a full description of the blog, dated March 16th, 2013, and titled "About The Blog." Instagram: @theblackcollegian

vivaillajams:

vivaillajams:

http://www.gofundme.com/JamillaOkuboParsoTuition

Hello,

My name is Jamilla Okubo. I am an Kenyan-American artist from Washington, D.C. Currently residing in New York City attending Parsons the New School for Design. I am currently a rising senior at Parsons studying Integrated Fashion Design (undergraduate), with a background in Fine Arts, and a focus on textiles and fashion design. 

I have been attending Parsons for three years now and I am getting ready to graduate this year as well as complete my senior thesis. I am currently $72,000 in debt to Parsons the New School for Design. For the past three years my mother has assisted me by  paying the remainder of my tuition with the Parent Plus Loan. My mother has borrowed $43,000 of the Direct Parent Plus loan. I still owe $12,000 for my last (senior) year at Parsons and mother and I can no longer take out Direct Plus Loans. 

I hope to be that minority student of color at Parsons, who represents the school, and inspires my younger siblings, and other minority/low-income students globally, to have the ambition and drive that I have, and not let financial issues get in the way of it.

I need $10, 787 to pay for the rest of my tuition for my last year at Parsons.

USAGE OF FUNDS:

-Tuition: $10,787
-School Supplies (Fabric, muslin, pattern paper, designing tools, paint, canvases, lab fees, books, fieldtrip fees)

ABOUT ME & MY PURPOSE AS AN ARTIST:

 As a multidisciplinary artist I am able to combine my skills and knowledge to create and express myself. My artwork mainly focuses on people of the Diaspora (people of color), whom I consider my community. I use my artistic disciplines as tools to challenge myself in ways to give back to my community, educate, and empower them as well as the rest of the world.

It is my duty to remind people of color that we have such a rich culture, and that we should love ourselves and one another. I create artwork for my community, because I believe that my purpose as an artist of color is to empower and educate my community.

My artistic discipline connects me to my community by allowing me to create artwork that my community is able to enjoy, embrace, and share with others. I not only create my artwork for myself, but what I express through the medium that I use, is a story that many in my community can relate to. When it comes to creating, I strongly believe in the fact that, 

“Black art controls the “Negro’s” reality, negates negative influences, and creates positive images,”

A quote by Sonia Sanchez. As an artist of color coming from a low-income, single-mother household background, I am able to speak for many in my community from both my experiences growing up as well as express the beauty and hardships of my community’s culture and history. Being able to paint allows me to create for myself but also allows my work to connect to so many from my community. That is the beauty of being an artist, being able to express shared feelings and experiences with your community, where they can also can all take something from what you create.
There is so much to learn, and from that form of inspiration and influence, I create.

RECENT INTERVIEWS:

OkayAfrica:  http://www.okayafrica.com/news/jamilla-okubo-textiles-paintings/#slide1

AADAT:  www.aadatart.com/interview-jamilla-okubo-on-her-cultural-background-creative-inspirations-and-favourite-things/

Portfolio Website www.jamillaokubo.com
Shop my art prints here: http://aadatart.com/product-category/art-prints/jamilla-okubo/

SPREAD THE WORD TUMBLR FAMILY! I LOVE YALL!

*SIGNAL BOOST THIS PLEASEEEEE*  

TUMBLR FAM. YALL ARE THE REAL MVPS.

IF I HAD ENOUGH HANDS TO MAKE A PAINTING FOR EACH AND EVERY ONE OF YOU! 

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR ALL YOUR SUPPORT AND INSPIRATION. ESPECIALLY YOU BEAUTIFUL BROWN PEOPLE. COULDN’T HAVE CREATED WHAT I CREATE WITHOUT Y’ALL. 

oromastherapy:

I need everyone’s help. Please retweet, use the hasttags #atauideng #findataui in your tweets and grams. Please upload photos of her. And call the NYPD and Trump models with any information you have. Any conversations you’ve had recently with her. ATAUI is more than my muse. She is my little sister. I love her so much. Believe me when I say I will not recover if this star is not found. My heart will fail. Please help find my Two-Way. Thank you.


Let’s help fond Ataui!

oromastherapy:

I need everyone’s help. Please retweet, use the hasttags #atauideng #findataui in your tweets and grams. Please upload photos of her. And call the NYPD and Trump models with any information you have. Any conversations you’ve had recently with her. ATAUI is more than my muse. She is my little sister. I love her so much. Believe me when I say I will not recover if this star is not found. My heart will fail. Please help find my Two-Way. Thank you.

Let’s help fond Ataui!

(via set-she-free)

vajadejade:

Hi, all! If I can have your attention for like fiiiiiiiive more seconds before you scroll past this…! 😁

If you’re interested, contact vajadejade! 

theblackcollegian.tumblr.com

vajadejade:

Hi, all! If I can have your attention for like fiiiiiiiive more seconds before you scroll past this…! 😁

If you’re interested, contact vajadejade! theblackcollegian.tumblr.com
mylifesimplee:

theblackcollegian:

mylifesimplee:

onlyblackgirl:

trebled-negrita-princess:

nappysupastar:

3rdeyechicago:

Miss Black America Beauty Pageant (1972)

What happend to this?

It had to be stopped because it was “racist against whites”.

Had to be stopped because it ignored white beauty standards. 


Can we start this again?  theblackcollegian

Yes, Ms. Naomi, the Deity - AKA BeyondSlay! mylifesimplee

First oh mah gah stop (;゜0゜) theblackcollegian also, as one of your lovely followers brought to our attention, it does in fact still exist. :/ however I’d still like to make another one with a different aesthetic. Ok basically a care free black girl pageant—Instead of the typical long hair mostly straight weave type thing. It’ll include a variety of hair and skin tones and nose widths and all types of black loveliness.

Still here for it! Even more here for it!

mylifesimplee:

theblackcollegian:

mylifesimplee:

onlyblackgirl:

trebled-negrita-princess:

nappysupastar:

3rdeyechicago:

Miss Black America Beauty Pageant (1972)

What happend to this?

It had to be stopped because it was “racist against whites”.

Had to be stopped because it ignored white beauty standards. 

Can we start this again? theblackcollegian
Yes, Ms. Naomi, the Deity - AKA BeyondSlay! mylifesimplee
First oh mah gah stop (;゜0゜) theblackcollegian also, as one of your lovely followers brought to our attention, it does in fact still exist. :/ however I’d still like to make another one with a different aesthetic. Ok basically a care free black girl pageant—Instead of the typical long hair mostly straight weave type thing. It’ll include a variety of hair and skin tones and nose widths and all types of black loveliness.

Still here for it! Even more here for it!

The Part of West Africa That Isn’t On The Continent

It’s five thirty in the afternoon, and I’ve just parted ways with a few friends after a great time at Union Market. I’ll admit: I am rather scantily-dressed; the hem of my dashiki barely reaches my thighs, and the shorts I’ve worn underneath do me no justice. “I’m loving this dashiki shirt…dress thing you’re wearing… Wait – is that a shirt?” my friend joked innocently earlier.

“It’s a shirt, but I have shorts on underneath, I swear!”

I decide to take the long way home to kill some time before leaving for a friend’s photography showcase near Howard. On my way down I Street, I approach a small bodega on whose walls two men are leaning and conversing. As I get closer, one of the men hurries inside.

I pass the small grocery store, seemingly unnoticed, when I suddenly hear, “That’s a very nice top.” I turn around and flash a smile to the man still leaning on the building’s wall.

“Thank you.”

“That’s a very nice top,” he says once more. “What part of West Africa are you from?” I thought to answer, “The part of West Africa that isn’t on the continent.”

“I’m actually Haitian.” He furrows his brow, and points to my dashiki. “Oh, this? This is from Ghana. It was a gift from a friend.”

“I see. Well, it’s beautiful, and that’s a beautiful thing: you wearing it.” His friend, who has quietly made his way back to the outside of the store, joins in, smiling and nodding in agreement.

“Thank you; thank you so much. Have a good one!” I wave goodbye and continue on my way home.

It wasn’t the first time that I’d been mistaken for another nationality. When meeting people at adjacent campus parties, I’d been asked whether I was Igbo or Yoruba, when, to be quite honest, I am entirely ignorant to the fundamental differences between the two groups. “You’re Jamaican, aren’t you?” Well, no; not exactly. Back home, in New Jersey, I indulged heavily in Colombian food, and could bachata to my little heart’s content because these were some, amongst many, of the cultures that I was immersed in. As far as I was concerned, my only crime was being culturally competent. Right? Wrong.

Or maybe. The truth is: during every instance that I was being mistaken for someone I was not, I was being caught clear in the act of – dare I say it – cultural appropriation. Yes, cultural appropriation; that thing that we continuously accuse Miley Cyrus, Iggy Azalea, and insensitive Halloween-goers of.

So, what is cultural appropriation anyway? To put it simply, cultural appropriation is the act of adopting aspects of another culture or cultural group. The term tends to carry a primarily negative semantic load, whereas Black women are demanding that gay white men stop borrowing from Black female culture, and Native Americans and East Asians are demanding that Halloween-goers discontinue the fetishizing of their culture.

So where do I come into this whole ordeal? How can I, an Afro-Caribbean woman be accused of the appropriation of West African culture, especially when I have West African ancestry? For me, it’s simple: I am a Haitian woman before I am an Afro-Caribbean woman of West African descent. My only ties to my ancestors’ Benin and Senegal lie largely in our common language – French – and, perhaps, in my physical features (and this has yet to explain my overindulgence in Nigerian, Ghanaian, and other cultures). Yet, I get away with it every time.

It is very often that we accuse non-POCs (people of color) of cultural appropriation, and yet we tend to pardon the act when it occurs amongst people of color.

This begs many questions: Who is permitted to appropriate elements of other cultures? To what extend is cultural appropriation negative or positive? Can the phenomenon be excused as a sort natural cultural mimicry among people of color?

Reblog with comments, or share your thoughts here.

theblackcollegian.tumblr.com

"When meeting people at adjacent campus parties, I’d been asked whether I was Igbo or Yoruba, when, to be quiet honest, I am entirely ignorant to the fundamental differences between the two groups…The truth is: during every instance that I was being mistaken for someone I was not, I was being caught clear in the act of – dare I say it – cultural appropriation.”
Post coming soon…
theblackcollegian.tumblr.com

"When meeting people at adjacent campus parties, I’d been asked whether I was Igbo or Yoruba, when, to be quiet honest, I am entirely ignorant to the fundamental differences between the two groups…The truth is: during every instance that I was being mistaken for someone I was not, I was being caught clear in the act of – dare I say it – cultural appropriation.”

Post coming soon…

theblackcollegian.tumblr.com

"How can I, an Afro-Caribbean woman be accused of the appropriation of West African culture, especially when I have West African ancestry?…Can the phenomenon be excused as a sort natural cultural mimicry among people of color?”
Post coming soon…
theblackcollegian.tumblr.com

"How can I, an Afro-Caribbean woman be accused of the appropriation of West African culture, especially when I have West African ancestry?…Can the phenomenon be excused as a sort natural cultural mimicry among people of color?”

Post coming soon…

theblackcollegian.tumblr.com

The DC Mayor’s Office on African Affairs (OAA) is looking for dynamic volunteers for the 5th Annual DC Africa Festival on Sunday, August 3rd from 12:00pm to 6:00pm. The Festival celebrates diverse communities of the District’s African diaspora through art, culture, food, history, and music.
 We are looking for volunteers who can support the event in a variety of capacities: assisting vendors, managing the registration table, coordinating children’s activities, and helping with logistics.
Interested? REGISTER NOW! Visit the event page for more information about the festival.
theblackcollegian.tumblr.com

The DC Mayor’s Office on African Affairs (OAA) is looking for dynamic volunteers for the 5th Annual DC Africa Festival on Sunday, August 3rd from 12:00pm to 6:00pm. The Festival celebrates diverse communities of the District’s African diaspora through art, culture, food, history, and music.


We are looking for volunteers who can support the event in a variety of capacities: assisting vendors, managing the registration table, coordinating children’s activities, and helping with logistics.

Interested? REGISTER NOW!
Visit the event page for more information about the festival.

theblackcollegian.tumblr.com